book review

Review: The Lhasa Trilogy

The Lhasa Trilogy
Written by Gary D. Conrad
Published on February 12, 2012 by Rainbow Books
319 pages
Fiction

13408447Synopsis:

On a frigid night at Tibet’s Drepung Monastery, Lama Tenzin Tashi is awakened by a fervent knocking on his door. Quickly he realizes these raps are dreaded harbinger, one which will launch him on a quest to satisfy a vow, a blasphemous promise he wishes he had never made. But at this point, the lama has no other choice. The journey must be undertaken, no matter the cost.

Thus begins an odyssey that spans not only his life, but also the life of a man born near a small town of Davidson, Oklahoma. Who could comprehend how inexplicably intertwined their pathways would become as they pushed aside the veil that concealed the hidden secrets of death?

The Lhasa Trilogy is an intriguing tale of incarnation, karma and redemption; while at its heart is universal spirituality. Even though this book is a work of fiction, I found it incredibly thought-provoking and enlightening. I have always been intrigued by Buddhism and this book gives a nice glimpse into that way of life.

The story is broken up into three interlinked books. First, Matthew Walker Johnston has been dealt an absolutely horrid life. He faces so many tragedies and is not able to overcome them. His inability to overcome the sorrow in his life leads him to make horrid life-decisions that damage his soul and/or karma. His journey for redemption is at the center of this story. Matthew is very self-aware of how badly he led his life. However, he set in motion a way for him and his incarnation to redeem them.

Lama Tenzin Tashi is a wonderful character who also has flaws that must be overcome in order to reach total enlightenment. Throughout his journey to search for Matthew’s next incarnation, he questions his motives. However, it is this journey that helps him to release his imperfections and find nirvana. I enjoyed his flashback of his early life. His reflections gave the reader a real glimpse into the Chinese treatment of Tibet. It was and is a horrible time for Tibet. Through Tenzin’s eyes, you are able to feel all of the atrocities that Tibetans face on a daily basis.

The last piece to this puzzle is Wade Joshua Adams. It is his responsibility to accept what is before him and take his life to another level. Wade is everything Matthew should have been. Together they have a chance for redemption and to make the world a much better place. Wade, Todd, and Sonali, also, give the reader knowledge that the people you love never leave you. Your journey is not complete unless you your loved ones surround you.

The Lhasa Trilogy is a very spiritually-laden book that should not be overlooked. My main take-away is that there really isn’t religion, only spiritual well-being. But there is a God and it is never too late for forgiveness and redemption.

KinxsBookNookScore4

Review: The Book of Life

The Book of Life (All Souls Trilogy #3)
Written by Deborah Harkness
Published on July 15, 2014 by Viking Press
576 pages
Supernatural Fiction

16054217Synopsis:

After traveling through time in Shadow of Night, the second book in Deborah Harkness’s enchanting series, historian and witch Diana Bishop and vampire scientist Matthew Clairmont return to the present to face new crises and old enemies. At Matthew’s ancestral home at Sept-Tours, they reunite with the cast of characters from A Discovery of Witches—with one significant exception. But the real threat to their future has yet to be revealed, and when it is, the search for Ashmole 782 and its missing pages takes on even more urgency. In the trilogy’s final volume, Harkness deepens her themes of power and passion, family and caring, past deeds and their present consequences. In ancestral homes and university laboratories, using ancient knowledge and modern science, from the hills of the Auvergne to the palaces of Venice and beyond, the couple at last learn what the witches discovered so many centuries ago.

With more than one million copies sold in the United States and appearing in thirty-eight foreign editions, A Discovery of Witches and Shadow of Night have landed on all of the major bestseller lists and garnered rave reviews from countless publications. Eagerly awaited by Harkness’s legion of fans, The Book of Life brings this superbly written series to a deeply satisfying close.

The Book of Life is a marvelous conclusion to the All Souls Trilogy. Deborah Harkness gave the reader a book that resolves storylines plus a wisp of hope that the story isn’t over. I loved every page and I was so sad to see it end. Once again, Ms. Harkness weaves a magical tale of love; however, with The Book of Life, she shows us what it means to be a family.

Throughout The Book of Life, the definition of family and loyalty is put to the test. Diana and Matthew redefine family by calling witches, vampires and daemons all family. I loved how that family had evolved so dramatically since A Discovery of Witches. There was so much distrust and hatred. Now there is love, loyalty and acceptance. Race purity is an ignorance and ancient concept. The sense of family conquered that basic racism.

Diana and Matthew reached their full character potential. Diana became an incredibly strong woman, witch, wife and mother. In A Discovery of Witches, she completely denied who she was and who she could be. By the end, she fully embraces herself and becomes the anchor of her family. Matthew, also, reached his full potential on a different level. He was so cold and detached; now he opens up to Diana and his family. He recognizes his faults and will willingly accept help. He is no longer just Diana’s protector. They are full partners in life and love.

The Book of Life is, by far, my favorite book of the year. I’m hoping, that one day, Deborah Harkness revisits and tells more amazing stories of Diana and Matthew. I’m so not ready to say good-bye. By the way The Book of Life ended, I feel there is possibility that Diana and Matthew will not fade away.

KinxsBookNookScore5

 

Review: The Bone Church

The Bone Church_BlogTour Banner FINAL

  • The Bone Church
  • Written by Victoria Dougherty
  • Published on April 15, 2014 by Pier’s Court Press
  • 308 pages
  • Historical Fiction/Thriller/Suspense

02_The Bone ChurchSynopsis:

In the surreal and paranoid underworld of wartime Prague, fugitive lovers Felix Andel and Magdalena Ruza make some dubious alliances – with a mysterious Roman Catholic cardinal, a reckless sculptor intent on making a big political statement, and a gypsy with a risky sex life. As one by one their chances for fleeing the country collapse, the two join a plot to assassinate Hitler’s nefarious Minister of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, Josef Goebbels.

But the assassination attempt goes wildly wrong, propelling the lovers in separate directions.

Felix’s destiny is sealed at the Bone Church, a mystical pilgrimage site on the outskirts of Prague, while Magdalena is thrust even deeper into the bowels of a city that betrayed her and a homeland soon to be swallowed by the Soviets. As they emerge from the shadowy fog of World War II, and stagger into the foul haze of the Cold War, Felix and Magdalena must confront the past, and a dangerous, uncertain future.

The Bone Church is a very poignant story of survival and love lost during and after World War II. Felix and Magdalena’s story seems heartbreaking at every turn. I wish I got say that love conquers all; everything but the Nazis and the Soviets.

There is so much passion in the book; passion for ways of life, country and spirituality. Felix really embodies all of that throughout the book. I love his spirituality and his ability to connect at different levels of perception. He receives at help from so many sources; real and mystic. He never gives up and his ability to survive does him credit in so many ways.

Of all of the characters portrayed in The Bone Church, Srut really stood out to me. He has such a strong sense of what is right and wrong; according to Srut. He is loyal to the people he trusts which are few. He will go to great length and sacrifice to save “his” people. He is a wonderful character and should be appreciated.

The Bone Church is a character in of itself. The author gave the reader some vivid images of what this church was. I loved how everything comes full circle at The Bone Church. Everything is resolved at the Bone Church.

The Bone Church is a wonderful book about a horrible time in the world’s history. But at its heart is survival and loyalty. It will stay with me for a long time.

KinxsBookNookScore4

About the Author03_Victoria Dougherty

Victoria Dougherty writes fiction, drama, and essays that often revolve around spies, killers, curses and destinies. Her work has been published or profiled in The New York Times, USA Today, International Herald Tribune and elsewhere. Earlier in her career, while living in Prague, she co-founded Black Box Theater, translating, producing and acting in several Czech plays. She lives with her husband and children in Charlottesville, Virginia.

For more information, please visit Victoria Dougherty’s website. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, and Pinterest.

The Bone Church Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, June 16
Review at Flashlight Commentary
Interview at Mina’s Bookshelf

Tuesday, June 17
Interview at Flashlight Commentary

Wednesday, June 18
Excerpt at The Musings of ALMYBNENR

Thursday, June 19
Guest Post at I’d So Rather Be Reading

Monday, June 23
Review at Based on a True Story

Tuesday, June 24
Review at Bibliotica

Friday, June 27
Review at Back Porchervations

Monday, June 30
Review at Dianne Ascroft Blog
Review at Oh, For the Hook of a Book

Tuesday, July 1
Interview at Oh, For the Hook of a Book

Wednesday, July 2
Spotlight at CelticLady’s Reviews

Thursday, July 3
Review at leeanna.me

Monday, July 7
Review at Library Educated

Thursday, July 10
Excerpt & Spotlight at Books and Benches

Monday, July 14
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Tuesday, July 15
Review at Kinx’s Book Nook

Thursday, July 17
Guest Post at Savvy Verse & Wit

Friday, July 18
Review at Curling Up By the Fire

Monday, July 21
Review at Book Nerd

Tuesday, July 22
Review at The Lit Bitch

Wednesday, July 23
Review at A Bibliotaph’s Reviews

Thursday, July 24
Review at Mari Reads
Review at bookramblings

Monday, July 28
Review at Queen of All She Reads
Review at Good Friends, Good Books, and a Sleepy Conscience
Guest Post at Historical Tapestry

Tuesday, July 29
Review at Historical Tapestry

Wednesday, July 30
Review at Luxury Reading

Thursday, July 31
Review at From the TBR Pile

Review: Murder by Misrule

 

Murder by Misrule_Tour Banner_FINAL

Murder by Misrule
Written by Anne Castle
Published on June 8, 2014 by Capital Crime
348 Pages
Historical Mystery

02_Murder by Misrule CoverSynopsis:

Francis Bacon is charged with investigating the murder of a fellow barrister at Gray’s Inn. He recruits his unwanted protégé Thomas Clarady to do the tiresome legwork. The son of a privateer, Clarady will do anything to climb the Elizabethan social ladder. Bacon’s powerful Uncle Lord Burghley suspects Catholic conspirators of the crime, but other motives quickly emerge. Rival barristers contend for the murdered man’s legal honors and wealthy clients. Highly-placed courtiers are implicated as the investigation reaches from Whitehall to the London streets. Bacon does the thinking; Clarady does the fencing. Everyone has something up his pinked and padded sleeve. Even the brilliant Francis Bacon is at a loss – and in danger – until he sees through the disguises of the season of Misrule.

Murder by Misrule is a highly entertaining story about murder, the law and politics; where none of which mix well together. This book is definitely a page-turner with very colorful characters. The storyline keeps you thinking to the very end.

I found Francis Bacon to be a tad tedious. His ongoing “ill health” made him very trying at times. However, his legal mind made him a terrific detective. I really enjoy when historical figures are made into fictional detectives and Ms. Castle had Bacon into a very intelligent detective. However, it is a good thing that Ms. Castle included Thomas Clarady in the story. He really brings life to it.

Thomas Clarady is quite a character. He is full life, love and gusto; plus underneath it all, he has a strong mind. I think Bacon and Clarady will make a good partnership for later books in the series. They are two sides of the same coin. Tom can effectively maneuver and persuade to get what he wants. If Bacon lacks finesse, Clarady definitely makes up for it. I look forward to more interaction between the two in later books.

The supporting characters were also very amusing. Ben and Trumpet have interesting storylines and I would very much like to see them more developed and involved with Bacon and Clarady.  They all make for a very interesting quartet.

Overall, Murder By Misrule is a very engaging mystery and sets up this new series nicely. I’m really looking forward to the second installment.

KinxsBookNookScore4

Buy the Book

Barnes & Noble
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About the Author03_Anna Castle

Anna Castle has been a waitress, software engineer, documentary linguist, college professor, and digital archivist. Historical fiction combines her lifelong love of stories and learning. She physically resides in Austin, Texas, and mentally counts herself a queen of infinite space.

For more information please visit Anna Castle’s website and blog. You can also follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

Virtual Book Tour Schedule

Monday, June 2
Review at Flashlight Commentary
Book Blast at Mari Reads

Tuesday, June 3
Interview at Flashlight Commentary
Guest Post at Historical Fiction Connection

Wednesday, June 4
Book Blast at The Musings of ALMYBNENR

Thursday, June 5
Book Blast at Our Wolves Den

Friday, June 6
Review at Book Nerd
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Saturday, June 7
Book Blast at Kelsey’s Book Corner

Sunday, June 8
Review at Carole’s Ramblings

Monday, June 9
Review at Ageless Pages Reviews

Tuesday, June 10
Book Blast at West Metro Mommy

Wednesday, June 11
Review at Oh, For the Hook of a Book
Book Blast at Literary Chanteuse

Thursday, June 12
Review at Curling Up By the Fire

Friday, June 13
Book Blast at Cheryl’s Book Nook

Monday, June 16
Book Blast at Closed the Cover
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Tuesday, June 17
Review & Giveaway at 100 Pages a Day
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Wednesday, June 18
Book Blast at CelticLady’s Reviews

Thursday, June 19
Review at Bibliotica
Book Blast at Historical Fiction Obsession

Friday, June 20
Review at A Bibliotaph’s Reviews
Interview at All Things Girl

Saturday, June 21
Book Blast at Griperang’s Bookmarks

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Tuesday, June 24
Review at Jorie Loves a Story

Wednesday, June 25
Book Blast at Susan Heim on Writing

Thursday, June 26
Review at A Bookish Girl
Review at Layered Pages
Review at Kinx’s Book Nook

Friday, June 27
Book Blast at Caroline Wilson Writes

Monday, June 30
Book Blast at Historical Tapestry

Tuesday, July 1
Interview at Starting Fresh

Wednesday, July 2
Review at Kincavel Korner

Thursday, July 3
Review & Giveaway at The True Book Addict
Guest Post & Giveaway at Bibliophilia, Please

Friday, July 4
Review at Svetlana’s Reads and Views

 

Review: Harvesting Space for a Greener Planet

22267879Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth
Written by Greg Matloff, C. Bangs, Les Johnson
Published in 2014 by Springer
203 pages
Nonfiction

Received this book from TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review.

Synopsis:

What was our planet like in years past? How has our civilization affected Earth and its ecology? This second edition begins by discussing these questions, and then generates a scenario for the restoration of Earth. It introduces new and innovative ideas on how we could use the Solar System and its resources for terrestrial benefit.

Harvesting Space for a Greener Earth is a fascinating book that poses some very interesting ideas on how to save our natural resources and continue to live on our planet. As an environmental attorney, I have worked in this field for almost 19 years and there are no easy answers on how to conserve our natural resources. By moving our energy production to space is an interesting idea but I’m not sure if it’s a viable one.

As this book stated, our planet is totally dependent on fossil fuels. We need to find a way to move away from that energy source; especially coal. If we could somehow harness the resources on the moon and somehow get them back to Earth, that would be an ideal situation. The authors pointed out that the moon is already dead. Pollution and mining activities will do it any more harm, unlike how it affects our planet.

I really like the idea of removing the significant pollution sources off our planet. However, the expense of the removal and the capture of those resources would be incredibly expensive. Furthermore, I know we are not ready from a technical standpoint. There needs to be extensive research and development to create an infrastructure that can be located off-planet. We are just not there yet. Also, the money involved would astronomical.

Overall, I found this book very thought-provoking and interesting. There are a lot of good ideas that would benefit our planet and move away from our dependency of fossil fuels which continue to pollute our world. We need a move balanced energy plan that benefits all living creatures on Earth. Do you think that’s possible? I just don’t know.

tlc logo

KinxsBookNookScore4

Review: That Old Ace in the Hole

334187That Old Ace in the Hole

Written by Annie Proulx

Published in 2002 by Scribners

357 pages

Literary Fiction

Synopsis:

Folks in the Texas panhandle do not like hog farms. But Bob Dollar is determined to see his new job as hog site scout for Global Pork Rind through to the end. However, he is forced to face the idiosyncratic inhabitants of Woolybucket and to questions his own notions of loyalty and home.

That Old Ace in the Hole is a wonderful book about preserving a way of life and not fall victim to corporate takeover. It is a refreshing take on small town life and how its residents refuse to let go of their stories and home.

The book’s antagonist is the wretched corporate hog farm. Not many people in Woolybucket favor the hog farms coming into their community. That’s why when Bob Dollar arrives in town he is told by his superiors to make up a cover story and not admit he’s scouting for a hog farm. The secrecy of Bob’s mission really conveys the message that Global Pork Rind is up to no good and doesn’t care about the people and their community. Global Pork Rind doesn’t care if they destroy the land or town. It is the evil and vile corporation at its best.

For the rest of my review, head over to The Red Dirt Report.

KinxsBookNookScore5

Review: Dreaming For Freud

Dreaming For Freud
Written by Sheila Kohler
Published on May 28, 2014 by Penguin Books
256 pages
Historical Fiction

18667786Synopsis:

Sigmund Freud’s motives and methods in taking on the seventeen-year-old daughter of one of his former patients seem highly questionable: what does he know about women’s psychology in the first place, and about adolescents, in the second? The outcome seems a preordained disaster.

From the day I was asked to review this book I was intrigued. I loved the cover and the storyline sounded fascinating. I have read other pieces of historical fiction that focused on Freud and I found those to be engaging and enjoyable. However, I was disappointed with Dreaming For Freud and it did not meet my high expectations.

First, I didn’t think the characters of Freud and Dora (the seventeen-year-old patient) were completely developed. I found it difficult understand the bond between doctor and patient that was supposed to be there. At one point, Dora felt totally dependent on Freud. However, I don’t know how she got there. Throughout the book, she seemed resentful towards Freud; far from being dependent. I would have liked to know how she became so enamored of him. I only felt her anger and bitterness for Freud’s lack of understanding of her problems.

The same thing can be said for Freud’s character. He seemed very self-absorbed and not digging very deep to help his patient. He was obsessed with dreams; whether they helped his patient or not. I would like to have read more about his theories and how he truly helped his patients. He seemed very detached. So, when he became very attached to Dora I found it a little perplexing. It didn’t make sense.

The ending seemed a little haphazard. In order to have resolution of the characters, the narrative kept bouncing back and forth between past and present. Dora’s adult life didn’t really fit with how she was as a teenager. I think this is where more development was needed to better explain Dora’s life. I felt Dora’s adult life was too disconnected from her teenage life to be plausible.

The one thing I did like about this book is the cover. It is beautiful and really grabs your attention. It makes want to open the books and start reading. However, I wish the story matched the cover. I don’t regret reading this book but I do wish it had a little more depth to the characters.

Review: The Return of Zita the Spacegirl

  • The Return of Zita the Spacegirl
  • Written and Illustrated by Ben Hatke
  • Published on May 13, 2014 by First Second
  • 240 pages
  • Graphic Novel

18465632Synopsis:

Zita the Spacegirl has saved planets, battled monsters, and wrestled with interplanetary fame. But she faces her biggest challenge yet in the third and final installment of the Zita adventures. Wrongfully imprisoned on a penitentiary planet, Zita has to plot the galaxy’s greatest jailbreak before the evil prison warden can execute his plan of interstellar domination.

Zita the Spacegirl is an amazing series for all ages; young and old. I loved reading it just as much as my daughter. Zita is an awesome character and a great role model. She is strong, loyal and extremely brave. She is willing to sacrifice herself for the people she cares about. These books have so many important messages that our kids really need to adsorb.

Loyalty and acceptance run deep in The Return of Zita. Her friends come from all different alien races. She embraces them all and will do anything to protect them. She has no prejudice and she accepts them as they are. In return, her friends will race to save her. Devotion runs thick throughout this adventure and sends a wonderful message to our kids.

The illustrations in Zita just jump right off the page. I love the colors and images. They tell an amazing story. Each page is filled with action and emotion. Each page keeps you totally immersed in the story. I just devoured each page.

I sincerely hope that this is not the last adventure for Zita. I want to read more! I want my daughters to read more! Zita the Spacegirl should be devoured by all.

KinxsBookNookScore5

 

 

Review: Floats the Dark Shadow

Floats the Dark Shadow
Written by Yves Fey
Published on August 15, 2012 by BearCat Press
340 pages
Historical Fiction/Psychological Thriller

13646255Synopsis:

Young American painter Theodora Faraday struggles to become an artist in Belle Époque Paris. She’s tasted the champagne of success, illustrating poems for the Revenants, a group of poets let by her adored cousin, Averill. When children she knows vanish mysteriously, Theo confronts Inspector Michel Devaux who suspects the Revenants are involved. Theo refuses to believe the killer could be a friend – could be the man she loves. Classic detection and occult revelation lead Michel and Theo through the dark underbelly of Paris, from catacombs to asylums, to the obscene ritual of a Black Mass. Following the maze of clues they discover the murderer believes he is the incarnation of the most evil serial killer in the history of France – Gilles de Rais. Once Joan of Arc’s lieutenant, after her death he plunged into an orgy of evil. The Church burned him at the stake for heresy, sorcery, and the depraved murder of hundreds of peasant children. Whether deranged mind or demonic passion incite him, the killer must be found before he strikes again.

Floats the Dark Shadow is an incredibly dark and provocative psychological thriller that is set in late nineteenth century Paris. This book is definitely not for the faint of heart. It is dark, twisted and very graphic. However, this book is well-written and very much a page-turner. The mystery of the killer’s identity will keep the reader engaged to the very end.

Paris is the perfect setting for this book. It is the perfect blending of darkness and light that makes Paris such a wonderful background. Further, the Belle Époque literary scene contributed heavily to the dark themes of the story. The Revenants, a group of poets who seem to want to wallow in gloom, play a very important part. They gather to share their demons and perpetuate their mission; spreading the darkness of their minds to the world. At the heart of the story, is whether the darkness has completely swallowed one of them. Ms. Fey did a wonderful job laying out the path of who the killer is. That path will keep you guessing at every wicked turn.

The occult runs throughout through the entire book. However, it is not just evil. There are several moments where “white magic” tries to prevail over “dark magic.” It is a constant battle between the two forces with no apparent winner. At the heart of the “white magic” is Theodora Faraday. She is portrayed as the light who attempts to destroy the darkness. She’s caught in the middle throughout this battle. The question is whether she will survive, physically and mentally. Her involvement with the Revenants leads her down a path that will change her life forever.

Gilles de Rais is not a fictional character. He, in fact, was a child serial killer during the fifteenth century. I found that fact to be truly disturbing. Ms. Fey brought him back to life to live in a new century and to find new innocent victims. He was truly a diabolical character. Evil permeated his every action. However, what was interesting is that he truly believed he would be saved by his actions; he would be forgiven and redeemed. It is a thought-provoking paradox that the author presented.

Floats the Dark Shadow is an unusual story that was very hard to put down. Its dark themes may disturb many but it is well-written and the plot was laid out in way that will keep you thinking. There isn’t a happy ending but it will leave you knowing that the light will prevail over the darkness.

Review: Love & Treasure

04_Love and Treasure_Tour Banner_FINAL

Publication Date: April 1, 2014

Knopf Publishing Formats: Ebook, Hardcover, Audio

  17842038Synopsis:

A spellbinding new novel of contraband masterpieces, tragic love, and the unexpected legacies of forgotten crimes, Ayelet Waldman’s Love and Treasure weaves a tale around the fascinating, true history of the Hungarian Gold Train in the Second World War.

In 1945 on the outskirts of Salzburg, victorious American soldiers capture a train filled with unspeakable riches: piles of fine gold watches; mountains of fur coats; crates filled with wedding rings, silver picture frames, family heirlooms, and Shabbat candlesticks passed down through generations. Jack Wiseman, a tough, smart New York Jew, is the lieutenant charged with guarding this treasure—a responsibility that grows more complicated when he meets Ilona, a fierce, beautiful Hungarian who has lost everything in the ravages of the Holocaust. Seventy years later, amid the shadowy world of art dealers who profit off the sins of previous generations, Jack gives a necklace to his granddaughter, Natalie Stein, and charges her with searching for an unknown woman—a woman whose portrait and fate come to haunt Natalie, a woman whose secret may help Natalie to understand the guilt her grandfather will take to his grave and to find a way out of the mess she has made of her own life.

A story of brilliantly drawn characters—a suave and shady art historian, a delusive and infatuated Freudian, a family of singing circus dwarfs fallen into the clutches of Josef Mengele, and desperate lovers facing choices that will tear them apart—Love and Treasure is Ayelet Waldman’s finest novel to date: a sad, funny, richly detailed work that poses hard questions about the value of precious things in a time when life itself has no value, and about the slenderest of chains that can bind us to the griefs and passions of the past.

Love & Treasure is a beautifully written story that will not leave your mind easily. Ms. Waldman weaves her story through several time periods; pre and post WWII and the present. She is able to interweave all the time periods into one amazing story.

I thought Ms. Waldman really captured the aftermath of WWII with honesty and intensity. Americans were not the knight in shining armor coming to rescue the Jews from imprisonment. Instead she writes of corruption, prejudice and depression. I found it so heartbreaking on how the survivors were trying live their lives after so much tragedy. The Jews didn’t have many friends or supporters. They had to create their own support system. The initials stages of the creation of Israel was incredibly interesting; but also depressing. It was so sad how other Jews thought of and treated the prison camp survivors. It seemed the survivors were expendable in order for the rest to regain their homeland. You wished for unity but its just not there.

The present day is all about forgiveness, redemption and rebirth. There is pain as there was in the past; but to different degrees. WWII veteran Jack Wiseman has put all of his guilt into one piece of jewelry. The pendent represents what he lost during the war and the corruption he witnessed. For him, returning the pendent to its rightful owner will relieve him of his burdens. His story with Ilona was incredibly sad. I wish Ms. Waldman included a bit how Ilona lived her life. Did she survive? Did she live a full life?

I wasn’t that attached to Natalie as I was to Ilona. However, I liked her tenacity to solve a mystery and fulfill her grandfather’s wish. It was nice that she was able to find love as well.

I really enjoyed how Ms. Waldmen ended her story. At first, I thought it was a bit disjointed but by the end it fit perfectly with the overall storyline. Nina and Gizelle made for a very tragic story in of itself. I would love to know more.

Love & Treasure is a wonderful book and should be read by anyone who loves WWII history.

KinxsBookNookScore4

Buy the Book

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Audible.com
Barnes & Noble
Book Depository
IndieBound

About the Author02_Ayelet Waldman Photo Credit Reenie Raschke

Ayelet Waldman is the author of the newly released Love and Treasure (Knopf, January 2014), Red Hook Road and The New York Times bestseller Bad Mother: A Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities and Occasional Moments of Grace. Her novel Love and Other Impossible Pursuits was made into a film starring Natalie Portman. Her personal essays and profiles of such public figures as Hillary Clinton have been published in a wide variety of newspapers and magazines, including The New York Times, Vogue, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. Her radio commentaries have appeared on “All Things Considered” and “The California Report.”

For more information please visit Ayelet’s website. Her missives also appear on Facebook and Twitter.

Her books are published throughout the world, in countries as disparate as England and Thailand, the Netherlands and China, Russia and Israel, Korea and Italy.

Virtual Book Tour Schedule

Tuesday, May 27
Review at Kinx’s Book Nook
Review at A Bibliotaph’s Reviews

Wednesday, May 28
Guest Post at Passion for Novels

Thursday, May 29
Review at Mari Reads

Friday, May 30
Review at She Reads Novels
Review at Dianne Ascroft’s Blog

Monday, June 2
Review at Flashlight Commentary

Tuesday, June 3
Interview at Flashlight Commentary

Wednesday, June 4
Review at Seaside Book Corner

Thursday, June 5
Review at Oh, For the Hook of a Book

Friday, June 6
Interview at Oh, For the Hook of a Book

Monday, June 9
Review at Closed the Cover

Tuesday, June 10
Interview at Closed the Cover

Wednesday, June 11
Review at A Bookish Girl
Review at Peeking Between the Pages

Friday, June 13
Review at Ageless Pages Reviews

Monday, June 16
Review at So Many Books, So Little Time
Guest Post at Historical Fiction Connection

Wednesday, June 18
Review at Let Them Read Books

Thursday, June 19
Review at Book Nerd

Friday, June 20
Review at Curling Up with a Good Book

Monday, June 23
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Tuesday, June 24
Review & Giveaway at Luxury Reading

Wednesday, June 25
Review at Lit Nerd

Thursday, June 26
Review at The Little Reader Library

Friday, June 27
Review at Man of la Book

Monday, June 30
Review at A Bookish Affair
Review at Just One More Chapter
Interview at Layered Pages

Tuesday, July 1
Interview at Jorie Loves a Story

Wednesday, July 2
Review at From L.A. to LA
Review at Mina’s Bookshelf

Thursday, July 3
Review at Jorie Loves a Story
Review at CelticLady’s Reviews

 

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Currently Reading

Kendal's bookshelf: currently-reading


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TBR

Kendal's to-read book montage

The Gods of Heavenly Punishment
Where Are the Dinos?
Lydia Bennet's Story: A Sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice
Cold Blooded
Bristol House
My Notorious Life: A Novel
Moms Who Drink and Swear: True Tales of Loving My Kids While Losing My Mind
Long Live the King
To Be Queen: A Novel of the Early Life of Eleanor of Aquitaine
Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore
Bad News for a Ghost
The Next Pendragon
Caroline Bingley
My Beloved World
Royal Mistress
My Dear Sophy
The Wild Girl
To Marry an English Lord: Or How Anglomania Really Got Started
Hades: Lord of the Dead
The Man Who Loved Jane Austen


Kendal's favorite books »

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